I Thought the Cup Game from Girls Camp Was a Secret

From this post:

We learned a fun cup game while we waited for our turn [to eat]. Two claps, three drums to the bottom of the cup facing up, one clap, pick up the cup with the right hand and set it to the right slightly (boom); clap, pick up the cup with the right hand, bringing the cup’s mouth to the palm of the left hand, set the cup down right side up (boom), pick the cup back up and put in the left hand, bang the right palm on the table (boom), and place the cup mouth down on the table space of the person to the right. The rhythm starts over and gets faster until your cup ends back in front of you. I still remember it, obviously.

This cup game combined singing teenagers and percussion, young women and an emotional bond created through rhythm. We laughed, we sang, we got loud and laughed some more. We also happened to sound great while doing all of that. I can hear the echoes of my memories so clearly.

I’ve come across variations of this cup game, and that only means that I have to admit to watching shows like Glee and movies like Pitch Perfect. They’re the same show, you say? Maybe. Do I care? Sort of, but also sort of not.

Sometime during Christmas break, I decided to catch up on this season of Glee. One of the first songs of the premiere features Provo’s/Las Vegas’s very own Imagine Dragons and their song, “It’s Time.” And the LDS Girls Camp Cup Game, of course.

Then last weekend, per a friend’s suggestion, Reilly rented Pitch Perfect. During one scene, Anna Kendrick’s character decides to audition for a college acapella group with just her voice and a cup. Fittingly, she sings a song called, “Cups,” and it features the LDS Girls Camp Cup Game.

These shows didn’t ruin my memories of girls camp. Instead, watching how trendy the cup game has become has allowed me to fondly reminisce about 100 girls chanting and drumming, with strong voices and drinking cups, a daily ritual that didn’t even last a week, every summer for four years. Those were such good times.

Part of a Conversation on Martin Scorsese’s The Departed — SPOILER ALERT

The movie won four Academy Awards. It’s dark, but it’s funny in the right places. It’s vulgar, violent and bitter. It’s not for viewers who like blatantly happy endings. Or even subtly happy endings. If you like rats, though, this is for you.

The following is an online chat about the movie. It has been edited for clarity. Skip the rest of this post to avoid spoilers.

person 1: you watch de-potted?
person 2: yiss
person 1: whatchoo fink?
person 2: he shooted him!
  they all shooted!
person 1: he shooted weo in da heed!
  did mawk wahboag and awick bodween meek you waff?
person 2: yiss
person 1: they funny–but they say the f wodes and the c wodes a lot
person 2: wots of bad wodes!
I don’t know why these people chat in baby talk. They seem pretty darn cute, though. And insufferably awesome.

Link to Engagement Photos

I promise there’s an engagement story.


I promise to write it.


But for now, you’ll have to settle for engagement photos.
Sorry to disappoint you. 😉


My good friend Heather took these.
Do you have any favorites?
Let me know in the comments.


Say, “Cheese!”

Parce que c’est fromage!

Tonight was our annual French Club soirée fromage. It felt a bit different this year than last year as a 101 student. I ran into mostly people who were in my 101 class, then a girl from 202, and a guy from 321. Then I got to talk to random strangers about Paris.

Also, when the jugs of juice were empty, I was standing in line, watching nothing come out of the spouts. Then I said, « Il n y a plus de juice ! » It rhymed, therefore it was funny. It’s not as funny – it’s actually downright sad to say it in English: “There isn’t any more juice.” That really makes me want to cry. I didn’t realize how much I love grape juice until it was all gone.

Saturday at a potluck, I met a guy (he was with his girlfriend) from Orleans. It was his first time in the United States. He was very soft-spoken, and his french was very smooth-sounding. We talked for a little bit. Being the way I am, I asked questions so that he would do most of the talking. He is not LDS, but he attended a session of General Conference in Salt Lake City. “Vous avez écouté les discours en français?” Of course he did. And he was very impressed with the interpreters. He prefers English to “American,” and I don’t blame him.

Sometimes I Like to Mock Things

The lighting here isn’t bad.

I’m back in the good ol’ US of A. I’ve been in Provo just over 24 hours. Jetlag is possessing my body, but in between naps I’m managing to be productive. Actually, it’s a fight between jetlag and stress. Hundreds of pictures to sort through. So many stories to tell. Too many memories to count.

Bon Effing Le St-Valentin

I don’t really have strong feelings either way about Valentine’s Day.  My stomach, however, starts churning vomit whenever I hear horrible pickup lines. We got a sheet of these in French class, so I decided to share them. They sound prettier in French, but are just as corny-cheeseball as they are in English. In parentheses are possible replies. In English. Of course.

-Est-ce que ton père a été un voleur? Parce qu’il a volé les étoiles du ciel pour les mettre dans tes yeux.
(If bad come-ons were a crime, they’d sentence you to an execution. That’s so much worse than my dad.)

-Tu n’as pas eu mal quand tu es tombé du ciel?
(Yes, and I declined first aid from you last time, too.)

-Tu dois être fatiguée parce que tu as trotté dans ma tête toute la journée.
(I am really tired, but it has to do with the sheer guff coming from your mouth right now.)

-Excuse-moi. On dirait que j’ai perdu mon numéro de téléphone… Est-ce que je pourrais emprunter le tien?
(I’ve lost my patience. Go. Now.)

-Est-ce que tu crois au coup de foudre au premier regard ou est-ce que je dois repasser?
(Dude, don’t walk by again. Just keep walking.)

-Excuse-moi. Est-ce que embrasses les inconnus? Non? Donc, je me présente.
(I have kissed strangers, but I don’t kiss friends. So yeah,  I’d love your name, thanks.)

-Tes pied doivent sûrement te faire mal, parce que tu t’es promenée dans mes rêves toute la nuit.
(Funny, my feet do hurt, though I dreamed I was stomping on someone’s heart.)

-Je viens d’arriver dans ta ville. Est-ce que tu pourrais m’indiquer le chemin jusqu’à ton appartement?
(I’d be more than happy to tell you how to get out of my life.)

-Est-ce que tu as un plan? Je me suis perdu dans tes yeux.
(No wonder my glasses are smudged.)

-La seule chose que tes yeux ne me disent pas, c’est ton nom.
(So, you can also see how they’re telling you to go away.  Now.)