My People from the Land of My Birth

This morning I looked at my newsfeed and out of over 120 articles, 20 of them were about damage or relief or something about the typhoon that struck the Philippines.

headlines

I’ve been thinking about my mom’s family who still live there. Because they’re my mom’s family, they’re also my family, even though I haven’t met very many of them. Aunts, uncles, cousins. I’ve been worrying the past few days if everyone is okay.

The LDS Church issued a statement that all its missionaries serving in the Philippines are accounted for. Definitely good news.

But I’ve been thinking more about the 10,000 or so who are missing or did not survive. This morning I called my mom and asked if she heard anything about her family. Mom lives in Florida, but she spoke with a cousin who keeps in touch more often with our relatives in the Philippines. Mom said that everyone is fine; they live in a more northwestern part and the typhoon did most of its damage in another part of the country.

map

Mom said she’s sure her family got a lot of wind and rain, since the typhoon was as big as or bigger than the country itself, but she’s relieved that her family are safe. I’m relieved, too.

One of the things I found encouraging about the headlines above is the clarion call to the world to get moving and help the Filipino citizens. Times like this remind us that we know how to reach out and be good people. These times motivate us to think about humanity and nudge our hearts to beat again, three times bigger.

If I could fly over there and start separating debris and hugging people, I would. I’ll have to find another way. Find your favorite organization, and see what you can do to help.

Keep praying.

Manalangin para sa Pilipinas.

2 thoughts on “My People from the Land of My Birth

  1. I was thinking about your family too while watching the storm coverage online– I’ve a friend in Manila but, as you note, they were spared the worst, so I’m glad to hear everybody you know is safe too. 🙂

    Loads of aid is coming in or en route but bottlenecked, or so I’m reading. 😦 If I could, I’d go over there and sort out the logistics (or, ideally, go back in time and sort it from the beginning…).

    One of the good highlights of the coverage, though, is that the Canadian govt is (as they often do for natural disasters) matching donations and I know there have been calls for the UK govt to do the same.

    • Your concern really means a lot, and I’m so glad you’re observing how different governments choose to provide aid. Yay, Canada! And hopefully, the UK!

      I know those of us who feel helpless can offer emotional support and friendship. I (and others) will always remember your efforts in this regard. 🙂

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